Unexplained Infertility: Amy’s Story [SUCCESS]

April 6, 2020

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Today’s success story is about a woman named Amy. She is a 38-year-old business owner who enjoys reading, exercising, and spending time with her friends and family. After six years of secondary infertility and trying all of the things, Amy and her husband embraced the journey of foster care. They finally came to a place where they were okay with the idea of having one child and loving other children whether they stayed or not. Three years later, she’s now raising four kids. After one year of fostering their now adopted son, she became pregnant spontaneously. You know how everyone says to just stop trying and it will happen, and it’s the most annoying thing in the world?!? Yep, that’s part of Amy’s story. Her daughter was born in December 2018 and her son was officially adopted in September 2019 after 828 days in foster care. This past December, they welcomed another foster placement. Join us to hear how Amy’s gone from one child to four in what feels like the blink of an eye — and what she’s learned along the way.

Episode Sponsor:

Infertility Coaching with Heather Huhman

What you’ll hear in this episode:

  • Before infertility, Amy was a hopeful person who dreamed of several kids and life as a stay-at-home mom
  • How she met her husband through a friend in a new city when they got together for a watch party for the TV show 24
  • As a couple, they are best friends who make a good team in raising their four kids
  • How Amy always wanted to be a mom, even as a kid when she jumped at every opportunity to babysit young children
  • Why Amy never had big career aspirations except for motherhood
  • After two unexplained early miscarriages, her son was born in 2011
  • After trying for a second child, Amy saw her Ob and did several Clomid rounds
  • Because they had good insurance coverage, they went to a fertility clinic and opted for three rounds of IUI–all unsuccessful
  • About the time they moved to Florida, Amy was emotionally exhausted, but then went on to two more Clomid rounds and started acupuncture
  • After some soul-searching prayers, Amy let go of her plan and became open to the idea of foster care and possible adoption
  • After going through the foster parent education process, they became foster parents for two short-term placements, but then a two-year-old boy came into their home; they officially adopted him in 2019
  • After about three years of not trying or tracking cycles, Amy found out she was pregnant, with their daughter, now 15 months old
  • When their daughter was a newborn, they started the adoption process for their son
  • Last December, they took in another foster daughter with special needs
  • How Amy’s life is full of joy and busy days with the four children, each of whom she considers a special gift
  • Why Amy saw her doctor at the beginning of their journey
  • The frustrating part of never having a diagnosis or an identifiable problem
  • Why Amy chose to foster, even though it meant dealing with the messy reality that the children wouldn’t be there permanently
  • The role of Amy’s infertility in her business and how she needed to feel successful and learn to face her fears
  • Amy’s tips for mothers: “Make time for the activities and people who fill your tank emotionally, use time blocks to live intentionally and prioritize each day, use a “progress over perfection” mentality, cultivate daily discipline, and practice gratitude.”
  • How the coronavirus pandemic is affecting foster care and training for foster parents
  • How infertility has changed Amy: “I’m way more authentic than before. I had a perception of who I wanted to be, but now the layers have been pulled back, and I realize who I want to be from now on. I can deal with pain better, and I’ve learned to be more flexible and open to change.”
  • Amy’s advice to herself back then: “Enjoy the process. Enjoy each season, and be present. Look at what you have, not what you don’t have.”

References:

Thanks for listening!

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