Tubal Factor Infertility: Jennifer’s Story [SUCCESS]

March 30, 2020

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Today’s success story is about a woman named Jennifer. She is a 40-year-old virtual consultant who enjoys going to the beach, doing crossword puzzles, and spending time with her family. A few short months after marrying her husband, Jennifer became pregnant, but it was ectopic. After 2 more ectopic pregnancies and an early miscarriage, both of her tubes were surgically removed. They consulted three fertility clinics and then moved forward with IVF at one of them. Their retrieval resulted in 8 embryos, and they transferred 2 of them. This resulted in their son. Ready for another child two years later, they returned to the clinic and transferred 1 embryo. It implanted, but unfortunately, she miscarried at around 8 weeks. Join us to hear how Jennifer transferred 2 more embryos about 2 years later and became pregnant with her daughter.

Episode Sponsor:

Infertility Coaching with Heather Huhman

What you’ll hear in this episode:

  • Before infertility, Jennifer was outgoing, busy, and successful
  • How she met her husband while on a date with someone else at the Kansas City Royals home opener baseball game
  • As a couple, they are very active together with outdoor activities, family-oriented, and fun-loving
  • As her sister had four babies in succession, Jennifer realized she wanted to be a mom, too
  • How Jennifer prepared for motherhood by becoming a virtual assistant so she could control her time and focus on family
  • Jennifer married and became pregnant soon after, but it was an ectopic at about eight weeks; the same thing happened a few months later, with an ectopic in the same tube
  • A third pregnancy(not ectopic) came soon after, but it ended in an early miscarriage; a fourth pregnancy was ectopic in the other tube, and Jennifer was crushed
  • When Jennifer had a test to check her uterus, it was found to be healthy and normal, and they were told that IVF was a viable option for them
  • They visited three clinics and chose one; ironically, they found out that Jennifer’s brother-in-law would be the lab director at the lab they would be using
  • The first IVF retrieval yielded eight embryos, so they transferred two; one developed and became their son, who was born healthy in February 2014
  • With six embryos frozen, they transferred one embryo two years later; it ended in an early miscarriage that Jennifer attributes to her stressful job
  • In their third transfer attempt, two embryos were transferred; Jennifer became pregnant (her job at the time was not as stressful), and her daughter was born in 2019
  • Impressions from the three clinics Jennifer visited: the first doctor was smart and serious, the second one was a strange blend of jokes and lightheartedness, and the third clinic had a staff that Jennifer adored (and her brother-in-law was their lab director)
  • How they felt when Jennifer’s tubes had to be removed
  • How Jennifer’s mom had similar tubal issues and traumatic pregnancy/birth experiences
  • Jennifer’s lowest point was when her tubes had to be removed, and IVF was the only remaining option
  • How Jennifer recovered by finding hope somehow in that her uterus was healthy and “beautiful”
  • A positive moment in the first IVF cycle, when Jennifer felt very positive and hopeful about the possibilities
  • How Jennifer felt excited and hopeful when she found out she would be a mom
  • How Jennifer balanced work and treatments with job flexibility
  • How Jennifer communicated with her bosses and coworkers about her journey
  • To afford treatment, they cashed in her husband’s retirement fund, borrowed some money, and cut back on extra expenses
  • How infertility was a “double-edged sword” in Jennifer’s relationship with her husband because they were both sad and stressed during their infertility journey
  • In relationships with friends and family, Jennifer found it difficult to be happy for others who were having children around the time of her losses
  • How Jennifer felt connected to her doctor and didn’t have to be a strong advocate for herself
  • How infertility changed Jennifer: “Infertility made me feel like, for the first time in my life, things were not easy for me. I was smacked in the face and humbled. I have more compassion for others who have difficulties conceiving, because this is something you can’t control, no matter how good you are at life.”
  • Jennifer’s advice to her past self: “Go with your gut. Do what you think is best for you and your family.”

References:

Thanks for listening!

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