Recurrent Pregnancy Loss & PCOS: Christine’s Story [SUCCESS]

September 17, 2018

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Today’s success story is about a woman named Christine. She is a 36-year-old business coach who enjoys horseback riding and traveling. After about a year of not trying but not preventing, she had her first miscarriage. Several months later, she had her second. Following a referral by her regular OB/GYN to a reproductive endocrinologist, she learned she had PCOS and was prescribed Femara. It worked, and she became pregnant. Unfortunately, that pregnancy also ended in a miscarriage. Several months later, she became pregnant again, and here’s where her story truly takes a turn for the worse. In March 2015, her daughter was stillborn at full-term. Join us to hear how Christine moved forward after all of her losses and eventually gave birth to her second daughter.

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What you’ll hear in this episode:

  • Before infertility, Christine was a super-driven, type A, high-achiever who thought she could accomplish and control whatever she wanted
  • How she met her husband online after a previous chance meeting when they both were dating others
  • As a couple, they are stronger than ever after working intentionally to support each other
  • Christine hesitantly wanted to be a mom, but had fear and self-doubt around motherhood
  • How she realized the magnitude of how their lives would change with a baby, even though her husband didn’t think it was a big deal
  • Christine always had irregular periods, and then went through a time when they weren’t really “trying,” but weren’t trying to prevent pregnancy
  • She got pregnant, had her first miscarriage, and then saw her Ob and was referred to an RE
  • Her second pregnancy also resulted in miscarriage, so she started on Femara due to a PCOS diagnosis
  • After a third pregnancy and miscarriage, they decided to take a break for awhile
  • During that time, she went off Femara, got pregnant naturally, and delivered her first daughter stillborn after going through a bout of perinatal depression
  • After hearing no heartbeat at her 37 week checkup, she went through the heart-wrenching process of induction and a 36-hour labor to deliver Maeve
  • How they tried for another pregnancy and had their second daughter almost two years ago
  • Why she started with her Ob-gyn instead of seeking a specialist
  • Why they switched clinics, prompted by a move and helped by Angie’s List
  • How she reached acceptance of her PCOS diagnosis
  • Christine’s lowest point, when she dealt with the full-term loss of her daughter, being totally unprepared for that possibility
  • How she felt alone and isolated in her daughter’s stillbirth, and notes it as the moment that forever changed who she was
  • “The fog of grief” and the tough decisions that had to be made
  • The nature and nurture component of resilience
  • A positive moment: remembering the photo shoot of their family with their daughter that captured a moment of unspeakable joy
  • How Christine wanted to share her story by starting a non-profit in honor of Maeve and now provides support for others
  • Why Christine chooses to share Maeve’s story often in her work
  • Her relationship with her husband continues to be a journey and how they support each other and seek support from others
  • How Christine had to renegotiate every relationship with friends and family and consider which ones showed up in her grief
  • Why each loss, no matter the circumstance, must be grieved
  • How Christine had to learn to advocate for herself
  • How infertility has changed Christine: “It’s made me much more of an advocate. I’m more honest about what I’m available for now.”
  • Christine’s advice to herself back then: “Say YES to offers of help. Be honest about what you need.”

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Thanks for listening!

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