Recurrent Pregnancy Loss: Amy’s Story [SUCCESS]

June 24, 2019

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Today’s success story is about a woman named Amy. She is a 47-year-old journalist who enjoys reading, writing and swimming. During the first 6 months of trying to conceive, she became pregnant spontaneously twice. Unfortunately, both ended in miscarriages. They tested the products of conception following a D&C after her second miscarriage and learned the embryo was genetically normal. Several months later, she saw her first reproductive endocrinologist, who diagnosed her with MTHFR. They spent the next six months doing IUIs without success. So, they moved on to mini IVF, which resulted in several more losses. They decided to try something completely different and headed to Israel to bank embryos. Unfortunately, after multiple retrievals, none were genetically normal. Join us to hear how Amy eventually moved on to donor eggs, sought the opinion of a reproductive immunologist, and became pregnant with her daughter.

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What you’ll hear in this episode:

  • Before infertility, Amy was more relaxed and a “go-with-the-flow” person
  • How she met her husband at a friend’s party at a bar that they still frequent today
  • As a couple, they are a well-oiled, well-functioning team that loves to have fun together
  • How Amy didn’t really know if she wanted kids but knew she would decide if she ever met the right person to share parenting with
  • A spontaneous pregnancy soon after marriage led to a miscarriage, and then another pregnancy followed, with no detectable fetal heartbeat after a few weeks
  • They progressed to IUI’s with no success, and then mini-IVF cycles, another pregnancy, a miscarriage, a D & C, and a chemical pregnancy
  • Why they went to Israel for free IVF, got five embryos, but none were genetically normal, so they moved to donor eggs
  • With donor eggs, she became pregnant again but miscarried at 6 weeks due to a blighted ovum
  • Amy saw a reproductive immunologist and got pregnant with new donor eggs, and had her daughter, who is now 4
  • What led Amy to seek help initially
  • The first impression of the RE’s office was that it “felt like a factory”
  • Why they chose mini-IVF when she really didn’t even know if she needed IVF
  • In Israel, there is no shame in IVF, many people do it, and everything is covered for citizens
  • How the protocol in Israel worked, and why there weren’t many adjustments
  • How Amy felt when she heard that her 2nd miscarriage was chromosomally normal
  • How she felt when doctors kept blaming her age, which wasn’t true
  • What Amy wished all fertility patients knew about miscarriage
  • Why she chose to see a reproductive immunologist
  • The lowest point for Amy, after the 4th miscarriage, when she found out both her siblings were expecting at the same time; she needed to take some time off from everybody at that point
  • A lighthearted moment, when she met a homeless pregnant woman begging for money on the NYC subway
  • Why Amy wrote about her experiences and ended up writing a NY Times column
  • How Amy’s insurance coverage helped with IUI’s, meds, and some of the IVF’s in the US, and how both their parents helped, too
  • How Amy’s relationship with her husband has grown over this journey, even though it took them some time to climb out of the disappointment
  • How their family relationships stayed the same, but they lost some friends along the way as their “circle got tighter”
  • How Amy learned to advocate and speak up for herself, after initially trusting that the doctors always knew best*
  • Why she never trusted a doctor who used the “one size fits all” approach to infertility
  • How infertility has changed Amy: “It’s made me less happy-go-lucky. It’s played with my optimism and my faith and made me worry more.”
  • Amy’s advice to her past self: “Hang in there.”

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Thanks for listening!

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