Reciprocal Translocation: Sarah’s Story [SUCCESS]

September 30, 2019

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Today’s success story is about a woman named Sarah. She is a 47-year-old entrepreneur who enjoys eating and running. During her first pregnancy, she was surprised to learn that both she and her child had reciprocal translocations. Thankfully, her daughter was born healthy. But when it came time to try for baby #2, things were much more complicated. During the next three years, she experienced four miscarriages. The following three years, they had three unsuccessful IVF cycles, including two with preimplantation genetic diagnosis. They returned to trying on their own the next three years, which resulted in several more miscarriages. Join us to hear how Sarah ultimately adopted her son and her husband had a vasectomy due to concerns for her health.

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What you’ll hear in this episode:

  • How Sarah never thought infertility would be part of her story
  • How she met her husband when they worked together, pretending to be “just friends” for a time
  • As a couple, they are strong and stable and have been through a lot together
  • As the youngest of 11 kids, Sarah has lots of nieces and nephews and always knew she would be a mom
  • How they moved across the country to be close to family when they decided to have kids
  • How Sarah conceived quickly and had an easy pregnancy, but testing revealed a chromosomal problem with reciprocal translocation for her and her baby
  • She had a natural birth and a healthy baby–who is now a senior in high school
  • When she wanted a second baby, she could get pregnant easily but kept having miscarriages
  • How Sarah chose a fertility clinic to pursue IVF, but couldn’t do PGD because of insurance requirements
  • The first IVF was the “turkey baster approach,” with no success
  • Further tests revealed Factor V Leiden mutation, which is a blood clotting issue, and ovarian reserve problems
  • The doctor recommended that they move forward with IVF with PGD to conceive a baby that didn’t carry the unbalanced genetic translocations
  • How Sarah was excited to have answers and a plan but didn’t have enough eggs to do a transfer
  • With insurance coverage problems on the IVF cycles with PGD, they didn’t have enough eggs to make it to transfer day
  • They moved across the country again, changed insurance, and tried on their own again for a couple of years
  • How they pursued the adoption process on their local area–and they were chosen by a set of birth parents
  • How Sarah kept getting pregnant and always thought one “would work out,” but there would always be a miscarriage
  • The final miscarriage was very intense and led Sarah and her husband to decide to stop trying; her husband even got a vasectomy out of concerns for Sarah’s health
  • What surprised Sarah most about infertility: being the youngest of 11 kids and still battling infertility, and thinking they had the best medical treatment plan available—but no success
  • What it was like to work in the children’s product industry while battling infertility
  • The lowest point for Sarah was when the IVF with PGD yielded no eggs when they started out with so much hope
  • How Sarah found the strength to move forward by asking, “What can we do to make it work?”
  • The positive moments of opening up and realizing she was not alone in her journey
  • How Sarah and her husband balanced work, treatments, losses, and adoption
  • How Sarah’s relationship with her husband focused on their conversations about their family-building journey
  • How Sarah had to “put on a brave face” in her relationship with friends and family
  • How infertility changed Sarah: “Infertility has made me a more open-minded, thoughtful, understanding, and caring person. I’m beyond grateful for this experience, even the tough ones because they built on one another to make me the person I am.”
  • Sarah’s advice to her past self: “Start your family earlier because you can’t choose how you build your family. To be honest, there is nothing I would really change.”

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Thanks for listening!

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