Prolactinoma, Low AMH, & High FSH: Annie’s Story [SUCCESS]

August 24, 2020

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Today’s success story is about a woman named Annie. She is a 40-year-old ESL teacher who enjoys outdoor activities, shopping, and watching reality TV. Annie and her husband began trying to conceive 6 months after they got married. Because she was over 35, she was extremely proactive. While charting her cycles, she suspected she wasn’t ovulating and went straight to her OB/GYN. After discovering she had high prolactin, she was referred to a fertility clinic. Further testing revealed she had a prolactinoma, low AMH, and high FSH. She was told she wouldn’t be a good candidate for IVF with her own eggs. However, after 2 weeks of grieving, she heard Episode 123 and was inspired to go straight to an egg donor. Although it was the scariest thing she’s ever done, they ended up with 3 embryos. Join us to hear how Annie’s first transfer ended in a miscarriage but the second resulted in her son.

Episode Sponsor:

Infertility Coaching with Heather Huhman

What you’ll hear in this episode:

  • Before infertility, Annie was an easygoing, adventurous health nut
  • How she met her husband while she was “online man-shopping”
  • As a couple, they are laid-back, humorous, and they work well together
  • How Annie always wanted to be a mom but didn’t think about it while she was having fun in her 20s
  • When she got married in 2017, Annie was 36, so they started trying to conceive within a few months; Annie tracked her cycles and read books to learn more about fertility
  • When she saw her OB/GYN, tests showed a form of the MTHFR mutation, hormone imbalance, and thyroid issues; she took special vitamins and medications to help
  • When her charted cycles showed inconsistencies in temperature, Annie suspected that she wasn’t ovulating, and her Ob sent her to a reproductive endocrinologist
  • An MRI of her brain showed a prolactinoma growth on her pituitary gland, and other tests revealed low AMH and high FSH
  • The moment when Annie got the news that she couldn’t have her own children, which were followed by two weeks of intense grief
  • How Annie learned more about egg donor IVF and became excited and hopeful
  • How BI Episode 123 helped Annie and gave her hope and confidence to move forward
  • After several troubling encounters, Annie found a new RE in 2018, and he was surprised at her readiness to go with an egg donor right away
  • How Annie and her husband dealt with the financial issues of the $18,000 cost
  • How strange circumstances provided them with about $10K in unexpected ways
  • Over Christmas break, Annie had the first transfer, which resulted in a chemical pregnancy
  • With two embryos remaining, Annie had another transfer in February, which resulted in the birth of her son
  • Why Annie started with her OB/GYN in the beginning
  • Annie’s first impression of her first fertility clinic was that the doctor was brilliant, but the clinic was small, old, and dark
  • Why Annie decided to be open about her infertility journey
  • What it was like teaching young kids while going through her infertility journey
  • How and why Annie grieved the loss of her genetics so easily
  • Why it took Annie a long time during her pregnancy to realize that she was really going to have a baby
  • Annie’s financial tips for infertility treatment: “Do what you can to improve your credit score and use no-interest credit cards when you can.”
  • How Annie realized how much her husband wanted to become a parent, too
  • How infertility changed Annie: “I’m the same person, but I’m a little pissed off at how little women are taught about their bodies and their cycles. I learned more going through infertility than I ever knew before. I feel like we should offer classes to young girls and women about hormones, protecting their fertility, and what to expect.”
  • Annie’s advice to her past self: “Physically, infertility is not as bad as you think it will be. It’s nothing to be scared of.”

References:

Thanks for listening!

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