PCOS & Male Factor Infertility: Kim’s Story [SUCCESS]

April 15, 2019

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Today’s success story is about a woman named Kim. She is a 25-year-old nutritionist who enjoys yoga, watching movies, and spending time with family. After a year of trying to conceive, she switched OB/GYNs to someone who specialized in fertility and began basic testing for herself and her husband. Her husband’s semen analysis came back less than ideal, so he was prescribed supplements and told to retest in three months. After three medicated timed intercourse cycles and no improvement in her husband’s sperm, they transferred to a fertility clinic. Her reproductive endocrinologist diagnosed her with PCOS and said IVF was their best chance at success. Their first retrieval cycle resulted in four embryos, all of which were frozen. The first embryo they transferred, the only one with a good grading, resulted in a chemical pregnancy. Join us to hear how Kim ultimately had a son following her second frozen transfer, this time with a fair embryo grading.

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What you’ll hear in this episode:

  • Before infertility, Kim was naive and more judgmental than she is now
  • How she met her husband when they were both teenagers, through a mutual friend
  • As a couple, they are complete opposites who work well together and love to annoy each other on purpose
  • How Kim always wanted kids, evidenced by her jobs as a babysitter, nanny, and dance teacher
  • How they bought a house and settled their careers to prepare for parenthood
  • In 2016, they started trying to conceive, and Kim focused on trying to live a toxin-free lifestyle
  • She tracked her cycles, switched to an OB/midwife practice, and had the first appointment and initial tests
  • Bloodwork showed normal results, she had an HSG test, but her husband’s semen analysis showed low sperm count, low morphology, and low motility
  • How she joined a support group that helped in many ways
  • They were referred to a RE in 2017 and realized the male factor issues meant IVF would be the best option
  • Kim was diagnosed with insulin-resistant PCOS, the symptoms of which she had ignored and attributed to overworking
  • The surprising news that insurance would cover IVF costs
  • The first retrieval yielded 17 eggs, 9 fertilized with ICSI, and 4 were frozen
  • Why they chose NOT to do PGS testing
  • The best embryo was transferred, and Kim became pregnant—but it was a chemical pregnancy
  • When they transferred another embryo, she became pregnant, and they saw the heartbeat at the 7-week ultrasound
  • At 13 weeks, the ultrasound showed it was a boy, but showed another sac where the embryo had tried to split into twins!
  • The great pregnancy ended in an unplanned C-section
  • Kim’s son is now 5-months-old, and she has just recently returned to work
  • How it felt to work at WIC around pregnant women and babies during her infertility journey
  • Her initial impression of the RE and fertility clinic
  • How Kim formed friendships with others on the journey and joined Facebook support groups
  • What IVF is like at the young age of 24
  • Kim’s lowest point, when she lost the first embryo in the chemical pregnancy; knowing she had three more embryos gave her the strength to go on
  • A positive moment, when she peed all over the doctor at her embryo transfer
  • How Kim was open with coworkers and got early morning appointments to balance work and treatments
  • How infertility brought Kim and her husband together and their families closer
  • Kim had to advocate during her birth, but her advice is to ask questions, get a second opinion, and change providers if you need to
  • How infertility changed Kim: “I’ve become less judgmental of others and very thankful for our experience and our son. It’s been a humbling experience.”
  • Kim’s advice to her past self: “Keep pushing.”

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Thanks for listening!

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