BONUS 202: Luteinizing Hormone 101

April 12, 2019

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Today’s bonus episode guest is Dr. Allison Rodgers. She is board certified in both Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility and has been practicing medicine since 2004. Dr. Rodgers currently practices at the Fertility Centers of Illinois. Her personal experiences with both secondary infertility and pregnancy loss have given her a unique insight into reproductive medicine in order to help you beat infertility.

Episode Sponsor:

Fertility Centers of Illinois

Dr. Rodgers begins by answering six listener questions. The full questions are read on the air, but here are brief summaries:

  • Maria is 40 and has had several unsuccessful IVF and IUI cycles. She asks if fertility medications could be making her embryos genetically abnormal, or if egg quality is simply diminishing with her age.
  • Mary has had several unsuccessful IVF and IUI cycles. In two retrievals, she had 45 eggs, but no Day 5 blasts. She asks if she should continue with her own eggs, or donor eggs, or push for a Day 3 transfer.
  • Dana asks if it’s possible to have PCOS and hypothalamic amenorrhea simultaneously, and if so, what the best treatment path would be.
  • Kristi‘s husband had a vasectomy reversal, and they’ve done two IVF rounds with no success. Donor eggs have been recommended, but she asks if supplements might improve her egg quality.
  • Heather had her first donor egg cycle recently; she asks about possible reasons for the lower blastocyst quality in the 32 eggs retrieved from her 21-year-old donor.
  • Erika has been diagnosed with premature ovarian failure at age 26, and she’s had multiple failed IVF rounds. She moved to donor eggs, but she wants to know if there is anything she can do to increase the rate of success for the next transfer.

Dr. Rodgers and Heather continue the episode by discussing everything you need to know about luteinizing hormone:

  • Let’s start with a foundation. What is luteinizing hormone, and where and how is it produced?
  • Broadly speaking, how does LH impact both women and men?
  • Do LH levels change throughout your cycle? If so, how and why?
  • Do LH levels change as you age? If so, how and why
  • Tell us about the normal range of LH at different ages for both women and men.
  • Tell us about too much LH in women:
    • What does this mean for a woman’s fertility?
    • What are the symptoms?
    • What are the causes?
    • What are the risk factors?
    • How is it diagnosed?
    • How is it treated (including any supplements)?
  • Tell us about too little LH in women:
    • What does this mean for a woman’s fertility?
    • What are the symptoms?
    • What are the causes?
    • What are the risk factors?
    • How is it diagnosed?
    • How is it treated (including any supplements)?
  • Tell us about too much LH in men:
    • What does this mean for a man’s fertility?
    • What are the symptoms?
    • What are the causes?
    • What are the risk factors?
    • How is it diagnosed?
    • How is it treated (including any supplements)?
  • Tell us about too little LH in men:
    • What does this mean for a man’s fertility?
    • What are the symptoms?
    • What are the causes?
    • What are the risk factors?
    • How is it diagnosed?
    • How is it treated (including any supplements)?
  • Tell us about the use of LH during an IVF cycle.
    • Why do doctors prescribe LH during IVF cycles, and at what point during the cycles?
    • What are the different types of LH an infertility patient might be prescribed, and at what doses? Please explain.
    • What are the possible side effects of prescription LH? How long do these side effects last?
    • Is there an ideal LH range for an embryo transfer? If so, why?
  • Is there any new, exciting research in the area of LH and fertility?
  • Do you have any success stories you can share about patients who had LH levels that were either too high or too low for their age?
  • Is there anything else you’d like to add about LH? (Medically, not related to words of hope.)
  • What words of hope would you offer to listeners who’ve been worried about their LH levels?

Have a question you want Dr. Rodgers to answer next time she’s on? Click here.

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