Luteal Phase Defect & Recurrent Loss: Amy’s Story [SUCCESS]

February 18, 2019

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Today’s success story is about a woman named Amy. She is a 38-year-old scientist who enjoys helping people conceive, playing with her kids, and working out. She became pregnant after about 6 months of trying to conceive, but unfortunately, it ended in a miscarriage. Six months later, the same result. Shortly thereafter, they sought the help of a reproductive endocrinologist. At first, she was prescribed Femara. She became pregnant several months later, but again, she miscarried. She had a laparoscopy to remove endometriosis and then moved on to IVF. Her first cycle failed, but her second cycle resulted in their first son. When they were ready for a second child with their remaining embryos, the cycle failed. Join us to hear how Amy took matters into her own hands and was able to conceive their second son spontaneously with the help of progesterone.

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What you’ll hear in this episode:

  • Before infertility, Amy was very passionate, competitive, and driven
  • How she met her husband at the gym while still in college, and they still work out together every morning
  • As a couple, they are mostly happy and have learned to communicate as parents
  • How Amy always wanted two kids
  • How they knew after trying for awhile that something was wrong, but was told they’d have to try to 12 months before a specialist would see them
  • A positive pregnancy test, but Amy knew something was wrong after a few days
  • The first IVF cycle and 10 great embryos—but no success
  • The laparoscopy to remove the endometriosis
  • How she got pregnant, but lost the baby at 8 weeks
  • Another IVF, which was a complete disaster with only 7 eggs
  • The eggs weren’t growing well, so the doctor called for an early transfer, and Amy got the call that she was pregnant
  • After a great pregnancy with no complications, her son was born via C-section and Amy faced a tough postpartum time
  • When he was 18 months old, they still had frozen embryos from the first IVF, so they did 2 transfers, which were both unsuccessful
  • How Amy came to terms with having only one child, but determined NOT to do any more IVF cycles
  • How she self-diagnosed her hormone imbalance and suggested to the doctor that she take progesterone
  • After a few months of progesterone, Amy conceived her daughter and carried her to full term
  • How she opened up to everyone about her infertility struggles and losses, and began using her experience and knowledge to help others conceive
  • Amy explains the first signs in the beginning that told her she needed help conceiving
  • How she felt amazing and supported at the first RE appointment, to finally be around the people who could help her get pregnant
  • Our current flawed system of treating infertility and why so many women are at a disadvantage
  • What women need to know about progesterone
  • The single most valuable thing Amy learned: “Listen to your body and advocate for yourself”
  • Why she quit her job to help other couples with similar problems
  • Why she didn’t want to do IVF before her second child, not because of the cost, but because of the emotional and physical pain
  • How she felt when progesterone was pinpointed as the cause of her infertility
  • The lowest point: going through IVF, when nothing worked and then surgery was required
  • A positive moment: Having many people who supported her and a doctor who would listen, and being able to use her issues to help others
  • How her relationship with her husband grew stronger and she made lifelong friends because of infertility
  • Tips in advocating for yourself: “Advocating is a must to get what you want. You are the only one who will speak up for you. Use notepads, emails, or whatever you need to ask the right questions.”
  • How infertility changed Amy: “I don’t even remember my life without infertility. I literally eat, sleep, and breathe infertility. I’ve accepted it and try now to help other people and their pain.”
  • Amy’s advice to herself back then: “Be more patient. There are many things I’d tell my past self not to do.”

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Thanks for listening!

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