Low AMH & Endometriosis: Meg’s Story [SUCCESS]

June 11, 2018

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Today’s success story is about a woman named Meg. She is a 32-year-old stay-at-home mom who enjoys taking walks in the park. After about a year and a half of trying to conceive and several rounds of Clomid with her regular OB/GYN, she switched doctors and learned she had low AMH and a blocked left tube. Her new doctor encouraged them to continue trying on their own, but several rounds of Letrozole later, she still wasn’t pregnant. Join us to hear how Meg moved on to a reproductive endocrinologist, was told she also had endometriosis, and ultimately became pregnant following IUI after initially being told IVF was their best chance.

What you’ll hear in this episode:

  • For fun, Meg loves visiting small towns in GA, visiting antique stores, and trying out new restaurants with her husband
  • Before infertility, Meg was ambitious, driven, and very involved in the big-city life of NYC
  • How she met her husband–on a popular dating website– while they were both living in NYC
  • As a couple, they are best friends with similar senses of humor and they love to laugh together and support each other
  • Meg always loved kids and wanted to be a mom
  • After their marriage, they waited before trying to conceive so they could be financially prepared
  • After waiting three years to try to have a baby, they thought it would happen quickly, but they saw an Ob-gyn in early 2016
  • The doctor didn’t do any tests, but recommended that they keep trying, because she was young and healthy
  • Prescribed Clomid and progesterone and an antibiotic, but no tests other than a semen analysis
  • In Sept. 2016, a new doctor and new tests that showed low AMH
  • An HSG showed a left tube blockage and a laparoscopy showed endometriosis
  • In April 2017, they saw an RE to explore their options and IVF was recommended as their “only hope” because of poor egg quality
  • A planned IUI, while Meg prepared with acupuncture and an emotional release technique to relax and prepare
  • Pregnant on the first try!
  • Why she went to an Ob first and how she found her RE
  • The first impression of the RE clinic and staff
  • The emotional rollercoaster of the expectation vs. the reality
  • The stress of receiving three diagnoses: Low AMH, blocked tube, and endometriosis
  • When Meg lost hope when they found out about the poor egg quality and IVF being their only hope
  • A fond memory in April, 2017, when Meg found out she was pregnant on Mother’s Day weekend
  • The pregnancy test, every ultrasound, and every appointment—how they confirmed that she really would have this baby
  • How they balanced work and treatments for two years, both working for a family-oriented ministry
  • The insurance coverage that provided for the doctor appointments and surgery but not the IUI
  • How Meg’s relationship with her husband grew stronger as they learned to lean on each other
  • How Meg’s relationship with friends and family also grew stronger and became a shared and common experience she could discuss with others
  • How Meg had to start advocating after her experience with the first Ob-gyn
  • Her son’s birth: Jan. 20, 2018–Even though it was a C-section, he was “so worth the wait”
  • How infertility changed Meg: “It made me stronger and allowed me to grow in my faith. I now want to help other women through this struggle and tell them not to give up.”
  • Meg’s advice to herself back then: “Stress less. You are going to be a mom. Don’t focus on statistics.”

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