BONUS 196: Long-Term Family Planning

March 1, 2019

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Today’s bonus episode guest is Dr. Julie Bindeman, a psychologist and co-director of Integrative Therapy of Greater Washington.

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Dr. Bindeman and Heather discuss everything you need to know about long-term family planning when you’re battling infertility:

INTRODUCTION

  • I’d like to start by hearing a little bit about you. Tell us about your professional background and training.
  • Why did you choose to specialize in reproductive psychology?
  • Take us through your career since your post-doc internship, including how you ended up at Integrative Therapy of Greater Washington.

LONG-TERM FAMILY PLANNING

  • Unless they only want one child, I always advise my coaching clients to approach fertility treatments and other parenthood options with the number of children they desire in mind. In your experience and opinion, is it important to think long-term rather than short-term? Why or why not?
  • How can listeners both think ahead to the future and remain present?
  • How can listeners, both singles and couples, sit down and determine the number of children they truly want? What does that conversation or thought process look like?
  • In your experience and opinion, is it important to be flexible when it comes to your long-term family planning? Why or why not?
  • How can listeners prepare for and approach this flexibility?
  • Given that it might change their treatment plan, how can listeners advocate for themselves about their long-term family planning with their medical care team?
  • Is there anything else you’d like to add?

BEYOND FERTILITY TREATMENTS

  • When a listener finds out they need donor gametes, surrogacy, or adoption to have their first — or subsequent — child — what emotions might they be feeling in that moment and why? Do women and men tend to feel and react differently?
  • How can listeners — both as individuals and together as couples — grieve this loss?
  • How can listeners, both singles and couples, sit down and determine which option is best, if any? What does that conversation or thought process look like?
  • How can listeners — both as individuals and together as couples — cope with the decision to move forward?
  • I’ve interviewed women who have multiple children by different means — some combination of biological, donor gamete, surrogacy, and adoption. How can listeners work though this possibility as part of their thought process around long-term family planning?
  • In the end, would a “blended family,” as described in the previous question, really be that much different? Why or why not? If so, how?
  • Is there anything else you’d like to add?

WRAPPING UP

  • What words of hope would you offer to someone who’s stuck when it comes to seeing the future of their family?

References:

Thanks for listening!

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