BONUS 184: History & Future of Fertility Science

December 7, 2018

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Today’s bonus episode guest is Dr. Michael Drews, a board-certified reproductive endocrinologist and founding partner at Reproductive Medicine Associates of New Jersey and clinical associate professor for the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology at Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

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Dr. Drews and Heather discuss the history of IVF and the future of fertility science:

INTRODUCTION

  • I’d like to start by hearing a little bit about you. Tell us about your professional background and training.
  • Why did you choose to specialize in reproductive medicine?
  • Take us through your career since your residency, including how you helped to found RMA of New Jersey.

HISTORY OF IVF

  • What did the birth of Louise Brown mean to the world, and how did it change fertility treatments forever?
  • How has fertility science changed overall in the last forty years? Take us through what had to happen to get to where we are today.
  • How have perceptions of IVF changed over the last forty years, and how did this transition happen?
  • What it was like working in the early 1990s when IVF success rates were lower and the technology was so different?
  • Is there anything else you’d like to add about the history of IVF?

FUTURE OF FERTILITY SCIENCE

  • Tell us about some of the latest studies and technology transforming fertility care today.
  • Why, as you frequently say, does the “entire field change every 5-10 years”?
  • What does the future of fertility science look like, and what advances can we expect in the future?
  • When a couple is visiting a fertility clinic for the first time, how can they gauge the quality of the lab? Why is this information important?
  • What are some other best practices you’ve picked up throughout your career?
  • Is there anything else you’d like to add about the future of fertility science?

WRAPPING UP

  • I’d love to hear some personal anecdotes about families and individuals you’ve worked with throughout your career.
  • What words of hope would you offer to someone who’s just starting on their infertility journey?

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Thanks for listening!

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