Endometriosis & Foster Care: Rebecca’s Story [SUCCESS]

March 25, 2019

Topics in this episode:
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on reddit
Reddit
Share on email
Email

Today’s success story is about a woman named Rebecca. She is a 27-year-old historical interpreter who enjoys knitting and doing puzzles. After a year of trying to conceive, she saw her OB/GYN, who recommended trying for another six months. At that point, when she still wasn’t pregnant, she returned to her OB/GYN for testing. She also discovered this podcast, immersed herself in learning about what might lie ahead, and opened up on Facebook about their situation. She transferred to a reproductive endocrinologist and underwent three timed intercourse and three IUI cycles, all of which were unsuccessful. Several months later, they switched their path to foster care. In the same month their foster care license came through, she had surgery to remove endometriosis. Join us to hear how Rebecca had her first successful foster care placement — and learned she was spontaneously pregnant only three months after the surgery.

Episode Sponsor:

What you’ll hear in this episode:

  • Before infertility, Rebecca was positive, upbeat, easygoing, and naive
  • Since she and her husband started dating as teenagers, she’s not even sure when they first met
  • As a couple, they are introverted homebodies and enjoy a laid-back lifestyle
  • Rebecca knew parenthood would be part of her future, but feared the responsibility
  • She saw her OB/GYN and talked about options after trying for a while; the doctor did some monitoring to check her levels and ovulation
  • Why they went public on Facebook early on about their journey
  • In May 2016, they went to an RE and did three TI cycles and three IUI cycles—all with no success
  • They took a foster care interest class to get information, and it became clear they were being led in this direction
  • As they became licensed foster care parents in April 2018, she had laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis
  • While she recovered, they got the first call for a foster care child, and they couldn’t accept, but another call came the next month—and they accepted
  • Later that summer, she had “funny” symptoms and took a pregnancy test; she’s 31 weeks pregnant now
  • Why she saw the doctor early on after trying for a while
  • The first RE appointment, when Rebecca felt like a number in the system
  • Why they pursued foster care instead of further treatments
  • How they might have gone back to fertility treatments if she hadn’t gotten pregnant
  • How fostering has changed her perspective on parenting and family life
  • How the endometriosis surgery may have helped her become pregnant
  • How she felt with the official endometriosis diagnosis
  • The lowest point, when a friend’s pregnancy announcement came while she was still waiting
  • A positive moment, when her husband gave a motivational speech to the vial of sperm
  • Balancing work, treatments, and fostering—with supportive bosses and coworkers
  • In her relationship with her husband, Rebecca says communication is the most important thing
  • How her relationships with friends and family changed, but mostly in good ways, and they received extra support from the small group at church and people on Facebook
  • Rebecca’s tips for self-advocacy include asking questions, gathering information, and voicing concerns
  • How infertility changed Rebecca: “It helped me be more confident as a self-advocate. I also became more aware of people around me who are struggling. I’m stronger than I ever imagined.”
  • Rebecca’s advice to her past self: “Don’t put your life on hold, even though it isn’t what you want right now. Keep planning the things that make you happy. Good things are coming.”

References:

Thanks for listening!

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on reddit
Reddit
Share on email
Email