BONUS 63: Egg Quality 101

August 12, 2016

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Dr. Allison Rodgers is board certified in both Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, and has been practicing medicine since 2004. She currently practices at the Fertility Centers of Illinois. Dr. Rodgers’ personal experiences with both secondary infertility and pregnancy loss have given her a unique insight into reproductive medicine in order to help you BEAT INFERTILITY.

After Dr. Rodgers answers listener questions, she and Heather explore everything you need to know about egg quality:

  • Before we dive too far into this topic, let’s talk about the lifecycle of an egg, starting with 90 days before ovulation.
  • Egg quality, as much as we don’t like to admit it, is closely related to age. As we’ve discussed before, there are young women with poor quality eggs and older women with eggs still in excellent condition, but for the most part, there is a pattern egg quality follows. At what point does egg quality begin to decline due to age and what are the signs this is happening?
  • Beyond age, there are other factors that impact egg health, such as blood flow and hormonal balance. Tell me about these factors and how they can be optimized for maximum egg quality.
  • Let’s talk about the various tests that can provide some insight into egg quality. First up, a Day 3 FSH and Estradiol Test.
  • Another test is known as a Clomid Challenge. What does that involve?
  • Another test looks at your AMH level. How is this test done, what is it looking at exactly, and what is considered normal?
  • The final test is an antral follicle count. What is this, how is it done, and what is considered normal
  • If you are diagnosed as having poor egg quality, what should your next steps be?
  • Is there any new research being done in the area of egg quality? Are there any new tests or procedures being developed?
  • Is there anything else you’d like to add on this topic?

Have a question you want Dr. Rodgers to answer next time she’s on? Click here.

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Words of Hope:

Egg health is an exciting area of research right now. It's exciting to see where this will lead us. Click To Tweet

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